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Studio Swine: South Pacific Gyre, 2015 (detail)

Work / Product Design

Studio Swine’s stunning objects from 1000 nautical miles worth of sea plastic

Sustainability can get a bit of a bad rap, but Studio Swine are one of many outfits showing that connotations of hemp trousers and the like are daft and outdated. The duo – who scrubbed up very well indeed in our Winter edition of Printed Pages – has recently added yet another string to their sustainable-but-beautiful bow in the form of these sumptuous Gyrecraft pieces. The decidedly opulent looking works were created thanks to an arduous 1000 nautical mile journey across the seas, which saw a crew using a “Solar Extruder” to draw plastic from the waters. The device works by harnessing sunlight to melt and extrude plastic from the sea, and these little fragments were then used to create five gorgeous objets d’art, one representing each of the five major ocean gyres.

“In the swirling gyre, most of the plastics have broken down into tiny fragments which are spread over massive stretches of the ocean,” Studio Swine explains. “Due to their size, they are incredibly difficult to recover in any large quantity making this once disposable material very precious.”

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Studio Swine: South Pacific Gyre, 2015

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Studio Swine: North Pacific Gyre, 2015

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Studio Swine: Indian Ocean Gyre, 2015

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Studio Swine: South Atlantic Gyre, 2015

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Studio Swine: South Atlantic Gyre, 2015 (detail)

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Studio Swine: South Pacific Gyre, 2015
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Studio Swine: Indian Ocean Gyre, 2015