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Work / Friday Mixtape

Friday Mixtape: So Young magazine curates a playlist inspired by the south London scene

This week’s Friday Mixtape is curated by Josh Whettingsteel and Sam Ford, the co-founders of music magazine, So Young.

Each issue of So Young is filled with pages of new bands to discover, often illustrated by some It’s Nice That favourites. This issue, the magazine’s 12th, sees the publication comment upon the south London music scene that has almost bubbled to boiling point over the past year.

Over to Sam and Josh to tell us a little more about their mix…

So_young_issue_twelve_front_cover_(online)

Why have you picked these songs?

This mixtape is made up of songs from the bands featured in this issue. Each issue defines the last three months of our lives and the new music that’s soundtracked them. This issue is heavily influenced by the current South London scene and the crop of bands emerging from there, bands like Goat Girl and Dead Pretties. So naturally we’re reminded of the gigs we’ve been to recently in South London, the late night kebabs and beer-drenched clothes.

When should this mixtape be listened to?

The majority of this list evokes imagery of urban landscapes to me so you could listen to it on your walk to work or on the tube maybe. But then there are bands like The Big Moon and Neon Waltz which have a much grander feel to them, leaning more towards long car journeys, driving to a festival out in the middle of nowhere.

What did you listen to as a teenager? 

Josh: The album that changed my life as a teenager was Down in Albion by Babyshambles.

Sam: The first album I listened to in full was What’s the Story Morning Glory? by Oasis. I suppose that shaped my future.

What song or album is consistently playing in your studio?

Josh: Goat Girl’s song Scum and The Queen is Dead by The Smiths.

Sam: Social Experiment by Dead Pretties and Solid Bronze by The Beautiful South.

If a feature film about your publication So Young was to be made, what song would be on the trailer?

Only Fools and Horses’ theme tune Hooky Street by John Sullivan or Best Friends by Palma Violets.