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Regulars / Best of the Web

From us to you, it’s the Best of the effing Web

Here we are again, it’s high time for your weekly online shake-down, carefully pulled from the heap by the It’s Nice That team. This week we bring together everything from the story behind British road signs, to a look at Wes Anderson’s obsession with symmetry, the relentless pace of the fashion industry, and Justin Bieber, of all people. Savour it, you’ve got a full seven days until the next one!

An unmissable Desert Island Discs with the boy who would go to sleep at night with his arm around his first guitar – Keith Richards. (Will)

With Raf Simons’ departure from Dior and now Alber Elbaz dismissed from Lanvin after 14 years, there has been a wave of press about the impossible pace of the fashion industry. The New York Times ’ fashion critic Vanessa Friedman looks at the slippery slope of fashion, which has claimed three top designers in recent weeks. And here, straight from the horse’s mouth, New York Magazine ​have published excerpts from a speech Elbaz gave last week. "Loudness is the new cool, and not only in fashion, you know,” he says. "I prefer whispering. I think it goes deeper, and I think it stays longer.” (Alex)

I always wanted to know the reasons or approach behind what makes Wes Anderson’s cinematography unique. This film is great at breaking it down, I love how symmetry can be so simply applied to so many different scenes and tie them all together aesthetically. (Ali)

From bedroom DJ to producing for Kanye West, Glasgow’s Hudson Mohawke has had a fast and furious rise to fame over the years. But how did it all come about? Noisey released the documentary Very First Breath earlier this week which sheds light on Glasgow’s thriving electronic scene as well as some wise words from Hud Mo’s mum and producer Mark Ronson to name a few. (Jamie)

Interview offers up an in-depth and insightful conversation_ with director Danny Boyle about his new film Steve Jobs. (Alex)

Bieber’s atonement, The New Yorker considers the weight and potential value of Justin Bieber’s season of apologies. (Billie)

The little-known story behind British roadsigns. (Will)

Art duo Gilbert and George talk to The Guardian in the lead up to their new show at White Cube. In the interview they talk about politics, nature and how “frigid” Europe is. “People don’t know what to think and they are not able to say anything anymore because they are so liberal they are not allowed – they have lost their moral fibre, the moral strength, lost all their conviction to act.” (Beccy)

Why Props Matter, a nice ten minute film looking at the role of props in cinema.

AnOther chart the cultural phenomenon of the fashion influencer in this article that features everyone from the Beatles to Barbie to Instagram. (Beccy)